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Trails


8801 Glenwood Avenue
Raleigh, NC 27617

919-571-4170
william.umstead@ncparks.gov

 

Map of North Carolina

GPS: 35.8905, -78.7502

 

8801 Glenwood Ave. entrance
 

  • November to February:
    7:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • March to April:
    7:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • May to August:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    7:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     
The gate at Crabtree Creek opens at 7 a.m. daily as part of a pilot program to allow early access to the trails system.
 

2100 N. Harrison Ave. entrance
 

  • November to February:
    8:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • March to April:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • May to August:
    8:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     
VISITOR CENTER:
  • 9:00am to 5:00pm daily
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     
EXHIBIT HALL inside visitor center:
  • 9:00am to 4:30pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

Tent and trailer family campground open
April 1 to October 31
 

  • April:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • May to August:
    7:00am to 10:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     
Campers: Please note that once the campground gates close, they are locked until the park reopens the following day. There will be no entry or exit permitted, except for law enforcement or medical emergencies.

 

List of trails

More than twenty miles of hiking trails provide access to most of William B. Umstead State Park. Visitors may choose between a short stroll along a nature trail or a more extensive hike into the woods. Either choice will be rewarding as the beauty and diversity of the park's natural resources are best seen from any one of its many trails. Some of the trails at the park interconnect; to avoid becoming lost, pay close attention to trail markers. No bikes or horses are allowed on hiking trails.

For people who prefer horseback or bicycling, approximately 13 miles of multiuse trails travel through some of the most scenic and secluded parts of the park. Horses and bikes are restricted to the multiuse trails and are not permitted in other areas of the park, including hiking trails. Multiuse parking is available on Sycamore Road past Maple Hill Lodge. All visitors with horses must be able to provide proof of a negative equine infectious anemia (Coggins) test while visiting North Carolina State Parks. All equestrians must check in at the Visitor Center, which is located off Highway 70/Glenwood Avenue, prior to riding on the multiuse trails.

 


Pott's Branch Trail
Location: Crabtree Creek Picnic Area at Glenwood Avenue Entrance

Description:

The short hike of 1.3 miles meanders along three small streams that eventually will flow into Crabtree Creek. The confluence of Pott’s Branch and Sycamore Creek is a popular stopping place along the route. A section of the trail is routed through the picnic area offering easy access.


Surface: natural surface

Length:
1.30 miles
loop
Difficulty:
easy hike
Blaze:
Orange Diamonds

Sal's Branch Trail
Location: Behind Visitor Center at Glenwood Avenue Entrance or near boathouse on Big Lake.

Description:

A popular trail in the park with easy access from the Crabtree Creek entrance. The trail is best reached from the parking lot located behind the visitor center or near the boathouse on Big Lake. The trail makes for a quick option with little elevation change throughout its route. Views of Big Lake are a highlight along the southwest section.


Surface: natural surface

Length:
2.80 miles
loop
Difficulty:
moderate hike
Blaze:
Orange Circles

Sycamore Trail
Location: Behind Crabtree Creek Shelter #1.

Description:

The park’s longest hiking trail at 7.2 miles. The trail begins behind shelter one located at the Crabtree Creek entrance. From there, a spur runs parallel to Sycamore Road and connects to the loop. Access is also available from the multi-use trail parking lot at the end of Sycamore Road. The trail follows Sycamore Creek for much of the loop. Both are named for the tree growing in North Carolina’s bottomland forests.


Surface: natural surface

Length:
7.20 miles
loop
Difficulty:
moderate hike
Blaze:
Blue Triangle