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Letchworth is New Superintendent at William B. Umstead State Park

Home >> Newsroom >> Press Releases >> Letchworth is New Superintendent at William B. Umstead State Park
Michael F. Easley, Governor
William G. Ross, Jr., Secretary

Release Note: 
Immediate
Contact: 
Charlie Peek
Release Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007
Phone: 
919-218-4622

Letchworth is New Superintendent at William B. Umstead State Park

RALEIGH -- Scott Letchworth, a veteran ranger at Falls Lake State Recreation Area, has been promoted to superintendent of William B. Umstead State Park in Wake County, according to the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation. Letchworth succeeds Martha Woods, who retired in September.

A superintendent is the chief of operations and administration at a state park or state recreation area with wide-ranging responsibilities for staffing, training, law enforcement, visitor services, natural resource protection and environmental education.

Letchworth grew up in Cary and graduated from Apex Senior High School. He worked as a seasonal employee at Jordan Lake State Recreation Area while earning a bachelor's degree in recreation and park management from Appalachian State University in 1996. He also served as an intern at Land Between the Lakes in Kentucky.

Letchworth worked at Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve in Cary before joining the state parks system as a ranger at Kerr Lake State Recreation Area in 1997. In 2001, he was promoted to a senior ranger position at Falls Lake, working at the Rollingview recreation site. He is a certified environmental educator.

'Scott's roots in the fast-growing Triangle and his obvious dedication to protecting its natural resources make him an excellent choice to lead William B. Umstead State Park,' said Lewis Ledford, director of the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation. 'It is an extremely busy park that sometimes faces conflicting demands, and he has the capability to address those issues.'

William B. Umstead State Park was first developed in 1934 as a Civilian Conservation Corps project and is one of North Carolina's oldest state parks. The park recorded 596,793 visits in 2006.