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Hyde is New Superintendent at Crowders Mountain State Park

Home >> Newsroom >> Press Releases >> Hyde is New Superintendent at Crowders Mountain State Park
Michael F. Easley, Governor
William G. Ross, Jr., Secretary

Release Note: 
Immediate
Contact: 
Charlie Peek
Release Date: 
Wednesday, February 1, 2006
Phone: 
919-218-4622

Hyde is New Superintendent at Crowders Mountain State Park

RALEIGH --Veteran ranger Larry Hyde has been promoted to superintendent of Crowders Mountain State Park in Gaston County, according to the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation. Hyde succeeds Joe Sox, who retired after 22 years in that position in late 2005 .

A superintendent is the chief of operations and administration at a state park or state recreation area with wide-ranging responsibilities for staffing, training, law enforcement, visitor services, natural resource protection and environmental education.

Hyde has been a senior ranger at Lake Norman State Park in Iredell County since February 2004. A native of Riverside, CA, he earned a bachelor's degree in park administration and natural resource management in1988 from California Polytechnic State University at Pomona. After serving with the Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation Department, Hyde joined the state parks system in 1992 as a ranger at Jordan Lake State Recreation Area and moved to Morrow Mountain State Park in 1993.

Hyde is an emergency medical services, CPR and law enforcement instructor for the division, serves on the division's Interpretation and Education Council and is a certified environmental educator.

"With his broad range of experience, Larry has long been an asset to the state parks system and he will be a valuable asset as well at Crowders Mountain," said Lewis Ledford, director of the division, in announcing the promotion. "The popularity of that park is growing quickly, and its profile has increased as part of a larger corridor of protected lands in that region."

Crowders Mountain State Park opened to the public in 1974 and now encompasses 5,094 acres. The park recorded 339,572 visits in 2005.