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A hiker enjoys the view at Grandfather Mountain State Park
Recent black bear activity   

Be aware that black bears have been active in the area within Grandfather Mountain State Park. Please use extra caution while hiking and camping. 

 Last updated on: Thursday, September 23, 2021

Passport sticker requests   

If you have visited Grandfather Mountain State Park and need your NC State Parks Passport booklet stamped after park office hours, a Passport sticker can be requested by emailing grandfather.mountain@ncparks.gov. Please include the number of stickers needed, your name, and a mailing address. 

 Last updated on: Thursday, September 23, 2021

Profile Parking Area & Profile Trail Now RE-OPENED   

The Profile Parking Area and Profile Trail are now back open following recovery from storm damage. There remains a closure on the lower portion of Profile Trail near the river, so please follow posted detour signage onto the Profile Connector, which leads back onto Profile Trial. 

 Last updated on: Thursday, August 19, 2021


Map of North Carolina – Grandfather Mountain State Park


Contact the park
 

828-963-9522


grandfather.mountain@ncparks.gov

 

Addresses
 

Park office

9872 N.C. 105 S.
Suite 6
Banner Elk, NC 28604

GPS: 36.1549, -81.7872

 

Profile Trail parking area

4198 N.C. 105 N.
Banner Elk, NC 28604

GPS: 36.1197, -81.8350

 

Mailing address

P.O. Box 9
Linville, NC 28646
 


Other accesses
 

Boone Fork parking area

Mile marker: 299.9
Blue Ridge Parkway
Banner Elk, NC 28604

GPS: 36.1200, -81.7813
(managed by NPS)

 

Asutsi Trail parking area

Blowing Rock Highway
(U.S. 221)
Blowing Rock, NC 28605

GPS: 36.1163, -81.7773
(managed by NPS)

 

Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation

2050 Blowing Rock Highway
Linville, NC 28646

GPS: 36.0851, -81.8462
(fee charged)
 

Hours
 

► 

  • To accommodate early hikes, park gates are not closed on a daily basis. However, they may close due to weather conditions.
     
  • November to February:
    8:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • March to May:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • June to August:
    8:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • Open Monday to Friday:
    8:00am to 4:30pm
     
  • You may contact our office during business hours or after hours; leave a message and we will return your call as soon as possible.
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

 

 

 

History highlights

Grandfather Mountain's stone profile faces have long gazed out over the ancient Appalachians, earning the acclaim of explorers and botanists alike as the apex of the Blue Ridge in grandeur and ecological diversity. Towering nearly a vertical mile over the Piedmont, Grandfather has been recognized for centuries as a sentinel summit. In 1794, the mountain's dramatic views convinced the Botanist Andre Michaux that he'd climbed "the highest peak in all North America." From alpine-like vegetation and vistas on the highest peaks, to cascading streams far down in the foothills, more than a dozen distinct ecological zones stretch across the landscape. Seventy-plus species of rare, threatened and endangered plants and animals populate this rugged mountain, making it one of the East's most significant peaks; a United Nations International Biosphere Reserve. The park is known for some of the South's most severe weather and challenging hiking trails. Be prepared—at times, hikers climb ladders up cliffs. Nature lovers and hikers alike find Grandfather Mountain to be a special, indeed globally significant place to encounter the outdoors.

In 2008, agreement was reached for the state parks system to acquire 2,456 acres of Grandfather Mountain to become North Carolina’s newest state park. The property is commonly known as the “backcountry” of the famous travel destination. The acquisition was arranged with the help of The Conservation Fund and The Nature Conservancy, which holds conservation easements on the mountain covering nearly 4,000 acres. The acquisition was financed by the Parks and Recreation and Natural Heritage trust funds.

In early 2009, the General Assembly formally authorized Grandfather Mountain State Park. This gives the state parks system the option of seeking additional acreage for traditional park facilities. Any additional tracts or facilities would be identified and prescribed through a public master planning process.