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Twin Falls at Gorges State Park
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Upcoming Events:

Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 9:45am
Saturday, June 1, 2019 - 10:15am
Saturday, October 19, 2019 - 9:00am
Chestnut Mountain Road Closure   

Chestnut Mountain Road will be closed April 22nd - 26th to allow the Wildlife Resource Commission to conduct road improvements between Turkey Pen Gap and the Horsepasture River. The road will re-open on April 27 and 28th and can potentially close again the 29th -3rd if construction is not completed the initial week.

 Last updated on: Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Auger Hole Trail Closed    

The Auger Hole trail is closed to all traffic until further notice due to existing safety hazards along the trail.  For updates call the park office or check on the parks website.

 Last updated on: Wednesday, January 16, 2019

History

Although you might feel removed from civilization while walking deep into the Gorges wilderness, evidence of past human interference with the environment surrounds you.

One of the most damaging interferences to the Gorges environment occurred in 1916 when the dam containing Lake Toxaway - the largest private lake in the state - broke. Record amounts of water gushed southward down the river, destroying the communities in its path, scouring the gorges and leaving piles of debris 15 to 20 feet high. These debris piles still remain.

After the flood, local citizens eventually sold large land tracts in the Gorges to Singer Sewing Machine Company, which logged most of the land. Then, in the 1940s and 1950s, Singer sold the land to Duke Energy Corporation. The corporation purchased the land for its steep topography and high rainfall, which offered opportunities for development of hydropower projects. Crescent Land and Timber Corporation, a subsidiary of Duke Energy, managed the land, closing some roads and limiting human access to protect the environment.

Conservation studies began in the area in the late 1970s, and in 1982 nearly 275 acres of land that is currently in the park was placed on the NC Registry of Natural Heritage Areas because of the numerous rare species. In the late 1990s, Duke Energy determined that it no longer needed large portions of the Gorges for future hydropower and offered the land for sale to natural resources agencies in North and South Carolina. The NC Division of Parks and Recreation stepped up to create, with the support of local citizens and the General Assembly, a very exciting state park.


976 Grassy Ridge Road
Sapphire, NC 28774

828-966-9099
gorges@ncparks.gov

 

Map of North Carolina

GPS: 35.096000, -82.951000

 

General Park Hours
7am to 9pm

Picnic Areas
8am to 7:30pm

Visitor Center
Monday - Sunday
9am to 5pm