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Ecology

Fishermen relax on the beach at Fort Fisher
Current status of park facilities   

The Basin Trail is open.

The 4WD beach is open. Staff are selling Annual Passes ($90) and day passes on-site at the park.

Pedestrian beach is open. The park office is open, but the exhibit room remains closed. A properly worn mask or face covering, covering both the nose and the mouth, is required to enter buildings.

Please note that this alert is updated only when something changes. Generally, state parks are following the phased reopening statewide. As of October 3, we are following modified Phase 3.

 Last updated on: Monday, October 5, 2020


Map of North Carolina – Fort Fisher State Recreation Area


Contact the park
 

910-458-5798

fort.fisher@ncparks.gov
 

Addresses
 

Park office

1000 Loggerhead Road
Kure Beach, NC 28449

GPS: 33.9534, -77.9290
 

Hours
 

► 

  • November to February:
    8:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • March:
    8:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • April to May:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • June to August:
    8:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • September:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • October:
    8:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     
  • Park gate is closed and locked at park closing time. Please see below for four-wheel-drive gate access.
     

► 

  • Open daily:
    8:00am to 5:00pm
     
  • Open most state holidays
     

► 

  • September 15 to
    March 31:

    24 hours a day
     
  • April to May:
    8:00am to 7:30pm
     
  • June to August:
    8:00am to 8:30pm
     
  • September 1 to 14:
    8:00am to 7:30pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • Open year-round:
    24 hours a day
     

 

 

 

Natural resources

Get plant and animal checklists at the park office.

Fort Fisher provides a glimpse of the dynamic ecosystem known as a barrier spit where the only constant is change. Sixteen threatened and endangered species can be found at Fort Fisher depending on the time of year. Loggerhead sea turtles nest on ocean beaches in the warmer months and terns, plovers, and oystercatchers use bare sandy areas from the beach to the salt marsh for nesting and foraging. Vast Spartina salt marshes, one of the most productive ecosytems on earth, provide food and shelter for fish and shellfish and shorebirds. Fall brings migrations of warblers, hawks, and peregrine falcons. Winter brings many species of ducks to the marshes. Storms constantly rearrange the landscape, overwashing dunes, opening and closing inlets and channels, and changing the shape of the beach. Native wildlife at Fort Fisher depends on this constant environmental change to maintain the habitat that it requires.