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Fews Ford at Eno River State Park
Current status of park facilities   

All accesses at Eno River State Park are operating under normal hours. Trails and restrooms are open. The restrooms close regularly throughout the day for cleaning and sanitizing; entry will be prohibited during this time.

Beginning on September 14, the park office is open from Monday to Friday, from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Beginning on September 20, the park office is open on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. A properly worn mask or face covering, covering both the nose and the mouth, is required to enter the office.

Picnic shelters can be used on a casual, first-come, first-served basis; they cannot be reserved at this time. All water fountains and hydrants are off; please be prepared and bring filled, reusable water bottles.

Tent campsites and group campsites are open. Reservations are required and can be made online or by calling Aspira at 1-877-722-6762.

Visitors should make their visits brief and focus on moving through the park without stopping any place where multiple people may be in one area. Please observe social distancing and bring a mask or face covering with you, so that you can use it when you are unable to be 6 feet from other people.

Please note that this alert is updated only when something changes. Generally, state parks are following the phased reopening statewide. As of September 11, we are following the new guidelines under phase 2.5.

 Last updated on: Friday, September 11, 2020

PEA CREEK TRAIL CLOSED    

The Pea Creek Trail (trailhead located at the Cole Mill access) is closed until further notice. Due to recent storms, erosion has undercut steps, put deep holes into the trail, and significantly damaged the trail. Do Not Enter From Any Access. 

 Last updated on: Tuesday, June 16, 2020


Map of North Carolina – Eno River State Park


Contact the park
 

919-383-1686

eno.river@ncparks.gov
 

Addresses
 

Fews Ford access
and park office

6101 Cole Mill Road
Durham, NC 27705

GPS: 36.0783, -79.0050

 

Cabelands access

4950 Howe St.
Durham, NC 27705

GPS: 36.0400, -78.9888

 

Cole Mill access

4390 Old Cole Mill Road
Durham, NC 27712

GPS: 36.0599, -78.9804

 

Pleasant Green access

4770 Pleasant Green Road
Durham, NC 27705

GPS: 36.0459, -79.0115

 

Pump Station access

4023 Rivermont Road
Durham, NC 27712

GPS: 36.0594, -78.9652
 

Hours
 

► 

  • December to February:
    7:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • March to April:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • May to September:
    7:00am to 10:00pm
     
  • October:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • November:
    7:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • December to February:
    7:30am to 6:30pm
     
  • March to April:
    7:30am to 8:30pm
     
  • May to September:
    7:30am to 9:30pm
     
  • October:
    7:30am to 8:30pm
     
  • November:
    7:30am to 7:30pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • December to February:
    8:30am to 5:30pm
     
  • March to April:
    8:30am to 7:30pm
     
  • May to September:
    8:30am to 8:30pm
     
  • October:
    8:30am to 7:30pm
     
  • November:
    8:30am to 6:30pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • November to February:

Monday to Friday:
8:30am to 4:30pm

Saturday to Sunday:
9:00am to 5:00pm
 

  • March to October:

Monday to Thursday:
8:30am to 4:30pm

Friday:
8:30am to 8:00pm

Saturday to Sunday:
9:00am to 5:00pm
 

  • Closed Christmas Day
     

 

 

 

History highlights

Archaeology tells us that men first walked trails along the Eno long before recorded history. Indians of the Eno, Shakori, and Occoneechee tribes lived along the river when the first European explorers passed through. Some of the tribes merged in the late 17th century and established a village near present day Durham. Settlers moved in during the mid 1700's to set up farms and gristmills. More than 30 mills were located along the length of the Eno.

Efforts to establish Eno River State Park started in 1965, when the city of Durham proposed building a reservoir in the river valley. A group of concerned citizens led a campaign to save the Eno and formed the Association for the Preservation of the Eno River Valley. The association proposed a state park be established and, in May of 1972, the state of North Carolina approved the idea. The city of Durham withdrew its efforts to construct the reservoir and in 1975 the state, with help from the Eno River Association and the Nature Conservancy, opened the park with more than one thousand acres of land.