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Activities

Carvers Creek

Map of North Carolina – Carvers Creek State Park


Contact the park
 

910-436-4681

carvers.creek@ncparks.gov
 

Addresses
 

Long Valley Farm access
and park office

2505 Long Valley Road
Spring Lake, NC 28390

GPS: 35.1970, -78.9767

 

Sandhills access

995 McCloskey Road
Fayetteville, NC 28311

GPS: 35.1700, -78.8943
 

Hours
 

► 

  • November to February:
    8:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • March to May:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • June to August:
    8:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • Open daily:
    8:00am to 5:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

 

 

 

Things to do


Long Valley Farm access

This access spanning over 1,400 acres features the old agricultural winter estate of James Stillman Rockefeller. This part of the park includes meadows, longleaf pine forests, and a historic millpond that is currently under repair. Jumping Run Creek crosses this property and feeds into the Lower Little River. Efforts to restore the Rockefeller house are underway. Structures that hikers can view from the trails include the pavilion, gristmill, packhouse, spring house, and farmworker houses.
 

Hiking

Long Valley Farm has two trails, the Rockefeller Loop Trail and the Cypress Point Loop Trail. Visit the Trails page for a full list of the trails and for additional information.

Please note that bicyclists must yield to hikers by stopping and moving to the side of the trail.

 

Biking

Both trails at Long Valley Farm are also open to biking. Horseback riding is not permitted at this access. Visit the Trails page for a full list of the trails and for additional information.

Please note that bicyclists must yield to hikers by stopping and moving to the side of the trail.

 

Please note: When trails are closed for construction, poor trail conditions due to weather, or any other reason, they are closed both for visitor safety and for the protection of the trail and natural resources. Trails are expensive to construct, maintain, and repair. Disregarding trail closures results in:

  • Delaying or prolonging construction or repair;
  • Damaging the trails, resulting in significant costs and further closure time for additional repair;
  • Endangering yourself in addition to both state parks and EMS staff who would work to get you out of harm's way if you are lost or hurt.

Thank you for respecting our park's natural resources, facilities, and fellow park visitors.

 

Picnicking

Bring a packed lunch and have a picnic or simply sit and enjoy nature. There are picnic tables along both trails, with trash and recycling bins nearby. A wheelchair-accessible picnic table is located adjacent to the parking area in front of the park office. This picnic area also has a grill.

There is a historic garage adjacent to the Rockefeller house with a grill and picnic tables. This structure also functions as a rain shelter.

 

Fishing

The millpond, which has been on the property since the 1850s, is an excellent spot for fishing. Please help us protect this area by using only the footpath access to the wat4er. This will prevent erosion and reduce your exposure to ticks, chiggers, and snakes. It is a 1-mile round-trip hike to fish at the millpond.

Anglers need a state fishing license and must obey the regulations of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.

 


Sandhills access

Opened in May 2019, the Sandhills access encompasses over 3,300 acres and hosts the Carvers Creek tributary, the park's namesake. Most of this property is covered in longleaf pine forest and home to a large red-cockaded woodpecker population. Much of this land remains undeveloped, allowing visitors to embrace the natural scenery of a fire-dependent ecosystem through 10 miles of trails. There are two small ponds at this access that offer fishing opportunities for hikers, bicyclists, and horseback riders. There is a restroom facility located adjacent to the parking lot, along with educational kiosks and trail maps.

 

Hiking

The trail system of the Sandhills access totals just over 10 miles, which is composed of seven trails on sandy soil. Visit the Trails page for a full list of the trails and for additional information.

Please note that hikers must yield to horseback riders and bicyclists must yield to both hikers and horseback riders by stopping and moving to the side of the trail.
 

Biking and horseback riding

All seven trails at Sandhills access are also open to biking and horseback riding. Visit the Trails page for a full list of the trails and for additional information.

Please note that hikers must yield to horseback riders and bicyclists must yield to both hikers and horseback riders by stopping and moving to the side of the trail.

These trails are "pack in, pack out" — please bring enough water for your adventure and take your trash back to the parking lot with you.

The parking lot and some sections of trail have crush and run rock where trail tends to be wet — boots and shoes are suggested for horses in these areas.

Please do not take your bike or horse off-trail as this can damage fragile longleaf pine ecosystems and wildlife.

 

Please note: When trails are closed for construction, poor trail conditions due to weather, or any other reason, they are closed both for visitor safety and for the protection of the trail and natural resources. Trails are expensive to construct, maintain, and repair. Disregarding trail closures results in:

  • Delaying or prolonging construction or repair;
  • Damaging the trails, resulting in significant costs and further closure time for additional repair;
  • Endangering yourself in addition to both state parks and EMS staff who would work to get you out of harm's way if you are lost or hurt.

Thank you for respecting our park's natural resources, facilities, and fellow park visitors.

 

Fishing

Two ponds at the Sandhills access offer fishing opportunities.

Access to the fishing ponds are on foot, bicycle or horseback. At this time, there is no vehicle access to fishing areas. A North Carolina fishing license is required and anglers must obey the fishing regulations of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.