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The shoreline at Carolina Beach State Park
Visitor center closures   

Due to staffing shortage, the park visitor center is currently open on a limited basis and may be closed during regular business hours. We apologize for the inconvenience. When the visitor center is closed, please visit the marina store for park information, camping check-in, restrooms, refreshments and other inquiries.

 Last updated on: Friday, August 20, 2021


Map of North Carolina – Carolina Beach State Park


Contact the park
 

910-458-8206

carolina.beach@ncparks.gov

 

Marina

910-458-7770
 


Addresses
 

Visitor center

1010 State Park Road
Carolina Beach, NC 28428

GPS: 34.0472, -77.9066

 

Mailing address

P.O. Box 475
Carolina Beach, NC 28428
 


Hours
 

► 

  • December to January:
    7:00am to 6:00pm
     
  • February:
    7:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • March to April:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • May to September:
    7:00am to 10:00pm
     
  • October:
    7:00am to 9:00pm
     
  • November:
    7:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • Open daily:
    8:00am to 5:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • December to January:
    8:00am to 5:30pm
     
  • February:
    8:00am to 6:30pm
     
  • March to April:
    8:00am to 8:30pm
     
  • May to September:
    8:00am to 9:30pm
     
  • October:
    8:00am to 8:30pm
     
  • November:
    8:00am to 6:30pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

► 

  • November to February:
    8:00am to 5:00pm
     
  • March to April:
    8:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • May to August:
    8:00am to 8:00pm
     
  • September to October:
    8:00am to 7:00pm
     
  • Closed Christmas Day
     

 

 

 

History highlights

The Cape Fear Indians lived in and around the area that is now Carolina Beach State Park, prior to European settlement. Mainly occupying the land along the Cape Fear River and its tributaries, the small tribe grew hostile to early settlers and, in 1715, participated in an uprising against Europeans in the area. The Cape Fear Indians were defeated and left the area by 1725. Artifacts of the native culture, including pottery fragments, arrowheads and mounds of oyster shells, have been found in the area.

Early attempts at colonization in the area were unsuccessful, mainly due to conflicts with the Cape Fear Indians. Pirating, common in the area during colonial times, also contributed to the struggles of early settlers. In 1726, a permanent settlement was established along the lower Cape Fear. The newly settled land became an important arena for commerce when the English crown designated the Cape Fear River as one of five official ports of entry. Agricultural and timber products, naval stores, shipping and trade formed the basis of the economy.

Sugarloaf, a 50-foot sand dune near the bank of the Cape Fear River, has been an important navigational marker for river pilots since 1663. The dune was also of strategic significance during the Civil War when, as part of the Confederacy's defense of the Port of Wilmington, about 5,000 troops camped on or near Sugarloaf during the siege of Fort Fisher.

Carolina Beach State Park was established in 1969 to preserve the unique environment along the intracoastal waterway.

The 761-acre park is located on a triangle of land known as Pleasure Island, which lies between the Atlantic Ocean and the Cape Fear River. The land became an island when Snow's Cut was dredged in 1929 and 1930, connecting Masonboro Sound to the Cape Fear River. Snow's Cut, a part of the Intracoastal Waterway, provides inland passage for boat traffic along the Atlantic coast.

Park Maps and Brochures:

Upcoming Events:

Saturday, October 23, 2021 - 10:00am
Saturday, October 30, 2021 - 10:00am
Saturday, November 6, 2021 - 10:00am