Morrow Mountain State Park  »  Ecology

Bridle Trail is open, August 29, 2014 ________________________________________________________________________ MOUNTAIN TOP AREA TO CLOSE FOR WATER AND ELECTRICAL LINE INSTALLATION: The scenic mountain top of Morrow Mountain within Morrow Mountain State Park will be closed from Monday, September 15 in the morning, until Friday, September 19 in the afternoon. Construction crews will be installing water and sewer lines underneath the park road to the summit during this time. Other areas of the park; including the lower picnic area, boat ramp, campgrounds, cabins and hiking trails will remain open during this time. ... details ±
POOL OPERATIONS UPDATE: The pool is scheduled to operate on normal hours (10 am to 5:45 pm) during August with the following exceptions. On August 29 the pool will be open but will close for lunch from Noon-1:00 pm. Monday, September 1st will be the last day of pool operation for the season.

BOATHOUSE IS OPEN - Currently open seven days a week from 9:30 am until 5:45 pm. Canoe on Lake Tillery, buy bait or ice, or get a snack and a soft drink from the concession stand. The boathouse will begin WEEKEND ONLY (Saturday & Sunday) operations after Labor Day (September 1, 2014). The boathouse will close for the season at 5:45 on Sunday, November 2, 2014 (Old Fashion Day).



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Plant & Animal  » Checklists

Morrow Mountain State Park is located in the ancient Uwharrie Mountains. Now worn down to rounded ridges that average less than 1,000 feet in elevation, these pinnacles are the remains of one of the oldest mountain ranges in the eastern United States.

This beautiful landscape is the result of powerful geological forces that began millions of years ago. Over time, wind and water eroded the lofty peaks to their more subdued profile of today. Of the four major peaks in the park - Morrow, Sugarloaf, Hattaway and Fall - Morrow Mountain is the highest at an elevation of 936 feet.

Waters and woodlands are home to a variety of plant and animal life. Frogs and salamanders live in and near streams and marshes, and warm rains bring the mating calls of spring peepers and chorus frogs. Birds enjoy the wooded environment in all seasons. In the upland forests, observant hikers may spot a scarlet kingsnake, one of North Carolina's most colorful snakes, or catch a glimpse of a white-tailed deer.