Morrow Mountain State Park  »  Ecology

The Bridle Trails are open. _______________________________________ Motorist and cyclists should be aware that construction crews will be installing water and sewer lines underneath and beside the park road to the summit for the next several weeks. There may be rough sections of roadway and brief delays while construction is ongoing. Please follow the directions of the flagmen. Other areas of the park; including the lower picnic area, boat ramp, campgrounds, cabins and hiking trails will remain open and unaffected by this construction. ... details ±
The BOATHOUSE is OPEN on WEEKENDS ONLY (Saturday & Sunday) through the first weekend in November. The boathouse will close for the season at 5:45 on Sunday, November 2, 2014 (Old Fashion Day).

The POOL is CLOSED for the season.

October 18 & November 15: YADKIN RIVER FALL FOLIAGE HIKES
Join a ranger at 3:00 pm at the Boathouse for a 2.4 mile round trip hike to the Falls Dam. We will identify the common trees and observe the Fall foliage here at Morrow Mountain State Park. Wear hiking shoes and bring binoculars if you'd like. Children must be accompanied by an adult.


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Plant & Animal  » Checklists

Morrow Mountain State Park is located in the ancient Uwharrie Mountains. Now worn down to rounded ridges that average less than 1,000 feet in elevation, these pinnacles are the remains of one of the oldest mountain ranges in the eastern United States.

This beautiful landscape is the result of powerful geological forces that began millions of years ago. Over time, wind and water eroded the lofty peaks to their more subdued profile of today. Of the four major peaks in the park - Morrow, Sugarloaf, Hattaway and Fall - Morrow Mountain is the highest at an elevation of 936 feet.

Waters and woodlands are home to a variety of plant and animal life. Frogs and salamanders live in and near streams and marshes, and warm rains bring the mating calls of spring peepers and chorus frogs. Birds enjoy the wooded environment in all seasons. In the upland forests, observant hikers may spot a scarlet kingsnake, one of North Carolina's most colorful snakes, or catch a glimpse of a white-tailed deer.